Komorebi #94

€230,00

Blue hitoe hiro eri kimono of the yukata type with komon pattern resembling a starry sky. It has a hand stitched black rope patch on the back.

 

FIT

Dress Length: 140 cm | 55.1"

Sleeve Length: 33 cm | 13"

Shoulder to Shoulder: 62 cm | 24.4"

 

MATERIAL 

Handmande in Japan

100% silk crêpe

Lining taffeta and synthetic silk

 

HISTORY

A kimono without liner is called hitoe, which means "single cloth". It is exclusively worn from June to September, the Summer season in Japan. In hiro eri, the collar is wide and its inside is not sewn to the body. When put on, the lapel can be folded in two to feature the widht desired and fall naturally toward the erisaki (the bottom of the collar). It is used in many women’s kimonos.

Yukata is an unlined kimono, originally based off of hot springs bathrobes, which has become very popular at summer festivals. Nowadays a young Japanese person may not wear kimonos very often and may only hire them for special occasions, but might well have one or more yukatas for summer wear, as they are usually hand washable, much more casual, easier to wear and easier to maintain.

Komon means "fine pattern" and is also a name for patterns made up of tiny details, appearing like a solid color from afar like this one. Edo komon is said to be originated from fine patterns put on the warriors formal dress called kamishimo in the Edo period .The fine patterns were first used in kamishimo in the Muromachi period and were widely used and developed as patterns during 1624-1644 in the Edo period. It is called komon gata or kamishimo komon and each feudal lord monopolized his own pattern denoting his feudal government. In the middle of the Edo period, however, the patterns were loved and widely used by common people and became finer and more diverse.

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