Komorebi #87

€245,00

Black awase hiro eri kimono of the komon type with kanoko shibori pattern complemented with kumo and kakitsubata motifs. It has been adapted to midi coat.

 

FIT 

Dress Length: 123 cm | 48.4"

Sleeve Length: 33 cm | 13"

Shoulder to Shoulder: 66 cm | 26"

 

MATERIAL 

Handmande in Japan

Exterior 100% synthetic silk

Lining 100% synthetic silk

 

HISTORY

Awase is a lined kimono, exclusively worn between October and May (from Autumn to Spring in Japan). In hiro eri, the collar is wide and its inside is not sewn to the body. When put on, the lapel can be folded in two to feature the widht desired and fall naturally toward the erisaki (the bottom of the collar). It is used in many women’s kimonos.

Komon is an informal kimono whose pattern repeats throughout the piece and often incorporates vertical stripes. Originally used as casual clothing, it is nowadays very rare since, with the westernization of clothing in Japan and the disuse of kimonos as a day-to-day wear, tailors have virtually ceased to produce it.

Shibori is a Japanese dyeing technique that typically involves folding, twisting or bunching cloth and binding it, then dyeing it in paint. Whatever is used to bind the fabric will resist the dye, resulting in areas of the cloth that take the distinctive dye in patterns created by the resistance, and other areas of the cloth that remain white. Kumo shibori produces a spider web effect. Arashi shibori produces a storm effect. Kanoko shibori produces a pattern resembling the spots on a fawn bounded in squares.

Kumo means cloud. In ancient times, the Chinese people performed augury by observing the figure or color of clouds which climbed toward the sky from mountains. This custom passed on to Japan and the motif of cloud began to be used widely. In after ages, the figure of the motif extended more transversally generating three distinct cloudy patterns: onigumo (“oni” originally means “ogre”, which often turns into the meaning of “fierce”); tanabikigumo (“tanabiki” means “trail”); and yokogumo (“yoko” means “horizontal”).

Hanakotoba is the Japanese form of the language of flowers. The Japanese have a long tradition of associating meanings to flowers, and they have influenced numerous aspects of their culture from kimono to war. Flowers such as the sakura (cherry blossom) and kiku (chrysanthemum) are national symbols of Japan. Such flowers have the power to invoke powerful emotions and they are engaged in the people's thinking. Beyond these national symbols, others have more subtle meanings. In Japan, they are a traditional gift for both men and women, and are often used to convey what can't be spoken. Even nowadays, flower meanings make occasional appearances in modern popular culture such as manga and anime.

Kakitsubata (iris) are beautiful flowers that bloom in Japan around May. The Japanese iris is distinguished by a yellow line at the base of the petals. If the line is white, it is a rabbitear iris, while a mesh pattern indicates a flag iris. The elegant forms of irises have made them popular as kimono designs since olden times. They are often depicted with flowing water on summer kimono and are especially valuable as motifs for expressing the water's edge. They are also often shown with yatsuhashi, bridges that run in a zigzag course. Iris root has a pleasant fragrance and in the Heian era was used by noble families as gifts or to decorate roofs. The flower offers protection from evil spirits.

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