Komorebi #78

€200,00

Purple and lavender awase hiro eri kimono of the komon type with with geometric sayagata texture and ume dyed pattern.

 

FIT

Dress Length: 157 cm | 61.8"

Sleeve Length: 35 cm | 13.8"

Shoulder to Shoulder: 62 cm | 24.4"

 

MATERIAL

Exterior 100% silk crêpe

Lining 100% cotton

 

HISTORY 

Awase is a lined kimono, exclusively worn between October and May (from Autumn to Spring in Japan). In hiro eri, the collar is wide and its inside is not sewn to the body. When put on, the lapel can be folded in two to feature the widht desired and fall naturally toward the erisaki (the bottom of the collar). It is used in many women’s kimonos.

Komon is an informal kimono whose pattern repeats throughout the piece and often incorporates vertical stripes. Originally used as casual clothing, it is nowadays very rare since, with the westernization of clothing in Japan and the disuse of kimonos as a day-to-day wear, tailors have virtually ceased to produce it.

We can say purple is the most noble color, kodai-murasaki being the most typical. Since ancient times, purple has been the noble color worldwide. In Japan, under the first system to rank officials into 12 levels established by Prince Shotoku in 603, purple was the color which was only allowed to be used by the top rank people. In the Edo period, edo-murasaki color became fashionable among ordinary people (Edo is the ancient name of Tokyo and murasaki means purple. In the era of the 8th Shogun Yoshimune Tokugawa, murasaki-sou (Lithospermum erythrorhizon) were grown and dyeing clothes in purple became popular around the west Edo. This purple color was bluish and called edo-murasaki, contrasting with kyo-murasaki (Kyo means Kyoto) which is reddish. Sukeroku, the main character in one of the famous kabuki performances “Sukeroku yukari no Edo-zakura”, wears a edo-murasaki browband. 

Sayagata is the pattern of interlocking manji, an ancient Buddhist symbol that has been used across many cultures for thousands of years. The symbol came to Japan in the 16th century and is known to represent life and strength.

Hanakotoba is the Japanese form of the language of flowers. The Japanese have a long tradition of associating meanings to flowers, and they have influenced numerous aspects of their culture from kimono to war. Flowers such as the sakura (cherry blossom) and kiku (chrysanthemum) are national symbols of Japan. Such flowers have the power to invoke powerful emotions and they are engaged in the people's thinking. Beyond these national symbols, others have more subtle meanings. In Japan, they are a traditional gift for both men and women, and are often used to convey what can't be spoken. Even nowadays, flower meanings make occasional appearances in modern popular culture such as manga and anime.

Ume is the plum blossom. Because plum trees bloom in winter, there is a saying that "the plum is the first among flowers". Prior to the Nara period (710-94), the word "flower" generally indicated the plum blossom, and in the Man'yoshu, an eight-century anthology of Japanese poetry, there are more verses about plum blossoms than cherry blossoms. A cherry tree now stands to the left of the Hall for State Ceremonies at the Imperal Palace, but originally a plum tree stood there and remained until after the Heian period (794-1185). In the Legend of the Flying Plum Tree, the cherry tree withers and dies after its master, Sugawara, leaves, but the plum and pine trees fly through the sky to be with him. However, the pine tree loses strength and falls to the earth in Settsu Province. Only the plum tree miraculously continues its flight and in a single day and night arrives at Daizaifu where its master resides and where it takes root. Ume is commonly associated with luck, nobility, purity, devotion and protection against evil.

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