Komorebi #74

€160,00

Indigo blue hitoe bachi eri kimono of the yukata type depicting ogi and matsu motifs, dyed in the katazome technique.

FIT

Dress Length: 148 cm | 58.3"

Sleeve Length: 32 cm | 12.6"

Shoulder to Shoulder: 65 cm | 25.6"

 

MATERIAL

Handmande in Japan

100% cotton

 

HISTORY

A kimono without liner is called hitoe, which means "single cloth". It is exclusively worn from June to September, the Summer season in Japan. In bachi eri, the collar is folded and sewn down to the body, extending naturally towards the erisaki (the bottom of the collar). It is called bachi eri because its shape is like bachi, the stick used to play the samisen (a three-stringed traditional Japanese musical instrument derived from the Chinese instrument sanxian).

Yukata is an unlined cotton kimono, originally based off of hot springs bathrobes, which has become very popular at summer festivals. Nowadays a young Japanese person may not wear kimonos very often and may only hire them for special occasions, but might well have one or more yukatas for summer wear, as they are usually hand washable, much more casual, easier to wear and easier to maintain.

Since ancient times, blue has been liked by the common people while purple has been a noble color. Ai-iro line is one of the representative color of the summer in Japan and is commonly used for yukata.

Ogi (fan) is very important in Japanese culture. Although the foldable fan originated in Japan and was introduced to China in the early tenth century, it was the Chinese technique of placing paper on both sides of the blades, which come together at the base to form a handle, that led to a new Japanese form called suehiro. Apart from their function of creating a breeze, they have become indispensable in exchanging greetings and at ceremonial occasions. They are a versatile design in kimonos - fans can be depicted opened out, layered one over the other to resemble ocean waves, or placed, for example, to resemble butterflies or chrysanthemums; they can also be scattered in various guises to form a pattern or fulfill the role of a canvas in which various designs can be incorporated. In traditional Japanese textile design, fans are associated with the "Seven Gods of Good Luck" and are very auspicious. Because they can be spread out, have come to symbolize development, expansion and prosperity. Also, its small ends represent birth and the blades symbolize the many possible paths leading away from this beginning.

Matsu (pine) is one of the Shou Chiku Bai (Three Friends of Winter), which comprises matsu, také (bamboo) and ume (plum blossom) and is traditionally used as a ranking system in Japan. Matsu is considered of the first rank, také of the second and ume of the third. Since ancient times, these three plants have been symbols of longevity, friendship, strength and integrity. Over time they have become common subjects in Chinese and Japanese painting, calligraphy and textiles, becoming an expression of celebration and joy. Matsu symbolizes longevity, steadfastness and wisdom and is profoundly associated with winter and the New Year. Sometimes, like in this particular case, it's also represented by the pine bark diamond pattern.

Katazome, mainly used to create repeat patterns on fabric, gained popularity in Japan as a simple way to mimic the look of woven brocades. It is a Japanese originated method of dyeing textiles with a resistant rice paste applied through a paper stencil (katagami), and the country is credited with developing this dyeing technique to a level of unparalleled sophistication.

Search