Komorebi #71

€180,00

Plum hitoe hiro eri kimono of the komon type with subtle blue and orange threads. It has been adapted to midi coat.

 

FIT

Dress Length: 97 cm | 38.2"

Sleeve Length: 32 cm | 12.6"

Shoulder to Shoulder: 61 cm | 24"

 

MATERIAL 

Handmande in Japan

Exterior 100% cotton

Lining 100% cotton

 

HISTORY

A kimono without liner is called hitoe, which means "single cloth". It is exclusively worn from June to September, the Summer season in Japan. In hiro eri, the collar is wide and its inside is not sewn to the body. When put on, the lapel can be folded in two to feature the widht desired and fall naturally toward the erisaki (the bottom of the collar). It is used in many women’s kimonos.

Komon is an informal kimono whose pattern repeats throughout the piece and often incorporates vertical stripes. Originally used as casual clothing, it is nowadays very rare since, with the westernization of clothing in Japan and the disuse of kimonos as a day-to-day wear, tailors have virtually ceased to produce it.

We can say purple is the most noble color, kodai-murasaki being the most typical. Since ancient times, purple has been the noble color worldwide. In Japan, under the first system to rank officials into 12 levels established by Prince Shotoku in 603, purple was the color which was only allowed to be used by the top rank people. In the Edo period, edo-murasaki color became fashionable among ordinary people (Edo is the ancient name of Tokyo and murasaki means purple. In the era of the 8th Shogun Yoshimune Tokugawa, murasaki-sou (Lithospermum erythrorhizon) were grown and dyeing clothes in purple became popular around the west Edo. This purple color was bluish and called edo-murasaki, contrasting with kyo-murasaki (Kyo means Kyoto) which is reddish. Sukeroku, the main character in one of the famous kabuki performances “Sukeroku yukari no Edo-zakura”, wears a edo-murasaki browband.

 

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