Komorebi #67

€180,00

Lilac hitoe bachi eri kimono of the komon type with hishi pattern.

 

FIT

Dress Length: 143 cm | 56.2"

Sleeve Length: 32 cm | 12.6"

Shoulder to Shoulder: 61 cm | 24"

 

MATERIAL

Handmande in Japan

100% cotton

 

HISTORY

A kimono without liner is called hitoe, which means "single cloth". It is exclusively worn from June to September, the Summer season in Japan. In bachi eri, the collar is folded and sewn down to the body, extending naturally towards the erisaki (the bottom of the collar). It is called bachi eri because its shape is like bachi, the stick used to play the samisen (a three-stringed traditional Japanese musical instrument derived from the Chinese instrument sanxian).

Komon is an informal kimono whose pattern repeats throughout the piece and often incorporates vertical stripes. Originally used as casual clothing, it is nowadays very rare since, with the westernization of clothing in Japan and the disuse of kimonos as a day-to-day wear, tailors have virtually ceased to produce it.

Hishi is a geometric pattern based on rhombus. It is believed that this shape was created spontaneously in prehistoric Japan, and several variations were developed in the Heian era as a pattern for Japanese textiles. There are many variations, however the most interesting are yotsuwaribishi or waribishi (quartered diamond), the pattern with flowers instead of diamond shapes, called hanabishi mon'you, very common between Heian and Kamakura Period; and saiwaibishi, the combination of geometrical and floral pattern.

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