Komorebi #5

€220,00

Black awase bashi eri kimono of the komon type depicting pink ogi decorated with brocade details of tsubaki, kiku and karakusa, over a komon pattern. The fabric is rinzu (jacquard).

 

FIT

Dress Length: 160 cm | 63"

Sleeve Length: 32 cm | 12.6"

Shoulder to Shoulder: 62 cm | 24.4"

 

MATERIAL

Handmande in Japan

Exterior 100% cotton

Lining 100% cotton

 

HISTORY

Awase is a lined kimono, exclusively worn between October and May (from Autumn to Spring in Japan). In bachi eri, the collar is folded and sewn down to the body, extending naturally towards the erisaki (the bottom of the collar). It is called bachi eri because its shape is like bachi, the stick used to play the samisen (a three-stringed traditional Japanese musical instrument derived from the Chinese instrument sanxian).

Komon is an informal kimono whose pattern repeats throughout the piece and often incorporates vertical stripes. Originally used as casual clothing, it is nowadays very rare since, with the westernization of clothing in Japan and the disuse of kimonos as a day-to-day wear, tailors have virtually ceased to produce it.

Komon means "fine pattern" and is also a name for patterns made up of tiny details, appearing like a solid color from afar like this one. Edo komon is said to be originated from fine patterns put on the warriors formal dress called kamishimo in the Edo period .The fine patterns were first used in kamishimo in the Muromachi period and were widely used and developed as patterns during 1624-1644 in the Edo period. It is called komon gata or kamishimo komon and each feudal lord monopolized his own pattern denoting his feudal government. In the middle of the Edo period, however, the patterns were loved and widely used by common people and became finer and more diverse.

Ogi (fan) is very important in Japanese culture. Although the foldable fan originated in Japan and was introduced to China in the early tenth century, it was the Chinese technique of placing paper on both sides of the blades, which come together at the base to form a handle, that led to a new Japanese form called suehiro. Apart from their function of creating a breeze, they have become indispensable in exchanging greetings and at ceremonial occasions. They are a versatile design in kimonos - fans can be depicted opened out, layered one over the other to resemble ocean waves, or placed, for example, to resemble butterflies or chrysanthemums; they can also be scattered in various guises to form a pattern or fulfill the role of a canvas in which various designs can be incorporated. In traditional Japanese textile design, fans are associated with the "Seven Gods of Good Luck" and are very auspicious. Because they can be spread out, have come to symbolize development, expansion and prosperity. Also, its small ends represent birth and the blades symbolize the many possible paths leading away from this beginning.

Hanakotoba is the Japanese form of the language of flowers. The Japanese have a long tradition of associating meanings to flowers, and they have influenced numerous aspects of their culture from kimono to war. Flowers such as the sakura (cherry blossom) and kiku (chrysanthemum) are national symbols of Japan. Such flowers have the power to invoke powerful emotions and they are engaged in the people's thinking. Beyond these national symbols, others have more subtle meanings. In Japan, they are a traditional gift for both men and women, and are often used to convey what can't be spoken. Even nowadays, flower meanings make occasional appearances in modern popular culture such as manga and anime.

Tsubaki (camellia flower) is one of the most popular Japanese patterns and has different meanings depending on the color: red flowers symbolize love and white ones show longing. The character for camellia originated in Japan and consists of a combination of the characters for "spring" and "tree", revealing the deep Japanese attachment to the camellia whose flowers most evoke the feeling of spring. In ancient times, it was thought to be a sacred tree with mystical powers. The eight-century Nihon Shoki or Nihongi, the second oldest book of classical Japanses history after the Kokiji records the story of how Emperor Keiko used a stick made from camellia wood to conquer local tribes. From the Kamakura period (1185-1333), the camellia finally gained appreciation as a flowering tree, while in the following Muromachi and Momoyama periods it came to be used as a subject in works of art and craft. However, it was during the Edo period (1615-1868) that the camellia reached its peak. Hidegata, the second shogun of the Tokugawa dynasty, planted a flower garden in the Fukiage palace and was presented with camellias by various provincial personages, sparking a craze for camellias which led to townspeople planting them in their own gardens. During the Edo perido, various inventories, including Hyakuchinzu (One Hundred Camellias) by Kano Sanraku, were produced and advances were made in their cultivation and hybridization. Splendid when used as a pattern on kimono or obi, camellias lend a feeling of warmth when used on haori jackets, giving the impression that spring has arrived on the exact spot they are decorating.

Kiku (chrysanthemum) represents longevity and rejuvenation. When first introduced in Japan during the Nara Period (ad 710–784), the Japanese royal family was fascinated with the flower. Eventually, during the passing of the years, the chrysanthemum became the imperial family emblem. Even now, it is used as the imperial symbol of Japan and figures on the Japanese passport. No plant is used in such a multitude of patterns as the chrysanthemum. Patterns showing this flower are called kikukamon; designs depicting chrysanthemum attached to stems are known as oriedakiku and flowers standing upright are called tatekikumon. A design in which chrysanthemums are rendered along with flowing water is called kikusui; teamed with a fence, the design is called kikumagaki. There is also much variation in terms of the flowers themselves, from the type whose petals are long and dishevelled, known as rangiku, to the round, extremely abstract kind which appear in works by the artist Kourin Ogata and are called kouringiku. The leaves of the chrysanthemums are on ovoid shape with jagged edges and appear in patterns in the form of rippled lines. The Chrysanthemum Festival, or Choyo or Kikuno-Sekku, is celebrated on the ninth month in the lunar calendar. It is an old Chinese custom that made its way to Japan and was adopted mainly at court. On that day, activities included drinking saké with chrysanthemum petals floating in it and wearing cotton that has been placed on top of the flowers overnight to soak up their dew. Drinking chrysanthemum saké was believed to ward off malevolence and ensure a long life.

Karakusa (arabesque) is an ornamental pattern consisting of interwined flowing lines inspired by stalks and tendrils and by the links between the leaves and vines of plants. Originated in the western Asia region, it spread throughout the world. A grape and arabesque motif can often be seen in the art of Persia during the Sassanid dynasty (300-700 CE). In China, the pattern appeared in the Han Dynasty (206 BCE-220CE), but its use for adorning clothing became widespread only with the arrival of buddhism in China after the third century. Karakusa became a central motif for clothing decoration during the Tang Dynasty (618-907 CE). The pattern is thought to have entered Japan in the fifth century via the Silk Road from China. Combined with botanical motifs such as hollyhocks, chrysanthemums and peonies, there is no limit to the number of karakusa patterns taht can be created. It is a symbol for eternity and sometimes a symbol for a family's legacy, like a family tree in the Western culture.

 

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