Komorebi #46

€220,00

Ivory awase hiro eri kimono of the komon type showing ogi decorated with kiku and momiji over a geometric orange komon pattern. It has a bright orange gradient at the bottom and sleeves’ hems. The fabric is habutae, a smooth, glossy silk cloth with a fine weave.

 

FIT

Dress Length: 152 cm | 59.8"

Sleeve Length: 33 cm | 13"

Shoulder to Shoulder: 63 cm | 24.8"

 

MATERIAL

Handmande in Japan

Exterior 100% satin silk

Lining taffeta and synthetic silk

 

HISTORY

Awase is a lined kimono, exclusively worn between October and May (from Autumn to Spring in Japan). In hiro eri, the collar is wide and its inside is not sewn to the body. When put on, the lapel can be folded in two to feature the widht desired and fall naturally toward the erisaki (the bottom of the collar). It is used in many women’s kimonos.

Komon is an informal kimono whose pattern repeats throughout the piece and often incorporates vertical stripes. Originally used as casual clothing, it is nowadays very rare since, with the westernization of clothing in Japan and the disuse of kimonos as a day-to-day wear, tailors have virtually ceased to produce it.

Ogi (fan) is very important in Japanese culture. Although the foldable fan originated in Japan and was introduced to China in the early tenth century, it was the Chinese technique of placing paper on both sides of the blades, which come together at the base to form a handle, that led to a new Japanese form called suehiro. Apart from their function of creating a breeze, they have become indispensable in exchanging greetings and at ceremonial occasions. They are a versatile design in kimonos - fans can be depicted opened out, layered one over the other to resemble ocean waves, or placed, for example, to resemble butterflies or chrysanthemums; they can also be scattered in various guises to form a pattern or fulfill the role of a canvas in which various designs can be incorporated. In traditional Japanese textile design, fans are associated with the "Seven Gods of Good Luck" and are very auspicious. Because they can be spread out, have come to symbolize development, expansion and prosperity. Also, its small ends represent birth and the blades symbolize the many possible paths leading away from this beginning.

Hanakotoba is the Japanese form of the language of flowers. The Japanese have a long tradition of associating meanings to flowers, and they have influenced numerous aspects of their culture from kimono to war. Flowers such as the sakura (cherry blossom) and kiku (chrysanthemum) are national symbols of Japan. Such flowers have the power to invoke powerful emotions and they are engaged in the people's thinking. Beyond these national symbols, others have more subtle meanings. In Japan, they are a traditional gift for both men and women, and are often used to convey what can't be spoken. Even nowadays, flower meanings make occasional appearances in modern popular culture such as manga and anime.

Kiku (chrysanthemum) represents longevity and rejuvenation. When first introduced in Japan during the Nara Period (ad 710–784), the Japanese royal family was fascinated with the flower. Eventually, during the passing of the years, the chrysanthemum became the imperial family emblem. Even now, it is used as the imperial symbol of Japan and figures on the Japanese passport. No plant is used in such a multitude of patterns as the chrysanthemum. Patterns showing this flower are called kikukamon; designs depicting chrysanthemum attached to stems are known as oriedakiku and flowers standing upright are called tatekikumon. A design in which chrysanthemums are rendered along with flowing water is called kikusui; teamed with a fence, the design is called kikumagaki. There is also much variation in terms of the flowers themselves, from the type whose petals are long and dishevelled, known as rangiku, to the round, extremely abstract kind which appear in works by the artist Kourin Ogata and are called kouringiku. The leaves of the chrysanthemums are on ovoid shape with jagged edges and appear in patterns in the form of rippled lines. The Chrysanthemum Festival, or Choyo or Kikuno-Sekku, is celebrated on the ninth month in the lunar calendar. It is an old Chinese custom that made its way to Japan and was adopted mainly at court. On that day, activities included drinking saké with chrysanthemum petals floating in it and wearing cotton that has been placed on top of the flowers overnight to soak up their dew. Drinking chrysanthemum saké was believed to ward off malevolence and ensure a long life.

Kaede was the original name for the Japanese maple tree and momiji was traditionally used to refer to all autumn foliage, not just maple leaves. Eventually, due to the popularity of the maple leaf as the iconic autumn leaf, momiji came to refer to only maple trees. Momiji-gari (autumn leaf viewing) is a popular activity for many people and a popular kimono motif. The interesting shape of the maple leaf makes it equally popular as a single motif and grouped on branches. It is particularly charming when depicted small, making it an ideal subject for embroidery on kimono. As with hydrangeas, it is a shame to wait until the maple’s leaves are turning red to wear kimono patterned with it and happily this motif also features on many summer garments and accessories. Wearing patterns of reddening maple leaves that suggest the impending cool fall season gives others a sense of coolness – a peculiarly Japanese act of consideration. Maple leaves are also used in combination with sakura (cherry blossom) on kimono, an arrangement which is called unkin or “clouds and brocade”. The sakura are clouds and the maple leaves the brocade. Conveniently, kimono sporting this pattern can be worn at any time of the year.

Komon means "fine pattern" and is also a name for patterns made up of tiny details, appearing like a solid color from afar like this one. Edo komon is said to be originated from fine patterns put on the warriors formal dress called kamishimo in the Edo period .The fine patterns were first used in kamishimo in the Muromachi period and were widely used and developed as patterns during 1624-1644 in the Edo period. It is called komon gata or kamishimo komon and each feudal lord monopolized his own pattern denoting his feudal government. In the middle of the Edo period, however, the patterns were loved and widely used by common people and became finer and more diverse.

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