Komorebi #45

€220,00

Ivory awase hiro eri kimono of the komon type with open books displaying nature motifs such as kakitsubata, matsu and kawa over burgundy amime pattern. The motifs on the book pages are painted in komon style. The fabric is habutae, a smooth, glossy silk cloth with a fine weave.

 

FIT

Dress Length: 159 cm | 62.6"

Sleeve Length: 33 cm | 13"

Shoulder to Shoulder: 67 cm | 26.4"

 

MATERIAL

Handmande in Japan

Exterior 100% satin silk

Lining taffeta and synthetic silk

 

HISTORY

Awase is a lined kimono, exclusively worn between October and May (from Autumn to Spring in Japan). In hiro eri, the collar is wide and its inside is not sewn to the body. When put on, the lapel can be folded in two to feature the widht desired and fall naturally toward the erisaki (the bottom of the collar). It is used in many women’s kimonos.

Komon is an informal kimono whose pattern repeats throughout the piece and often incorporates vertical stripes. Originally used as casual clothing, it is nowadays very rare since, with the westernization of clothing in Japan and the disuse of kimonos as a day-to-day wear, tailors have virtually ceased to produce it.

Hanakotoba is the Japanese form of the language of flowers. The Japanese have a long tradition of associating meanings to flowers, and they have influenced numerous aspects of their culture from kimono to war. Flowers such as the sakura (cherry blossom) and kiku (chrysanthemum) are national symbols of Japan. Such flowers have the power to invoke powerful emotions and they are engaged in the people's thinking. Beyond these national symbols, others have more subtle meanings. In Japan, they are a traditional gift for both men and women, and are often used to convey what can't be spoken. Even nowadays, flower meanings make occasional appearances in modern popular culture such as manga and anime.

Kakitsubata (iris) are beautiful flowers that bloom in Japan around May. The Japanese iris is distinguished by a yellow line at the base of the petals. If the line is white, it is a rabbitear iris, while a mesh pattern indicates a flag iris. The elegant forms of irises have made them popular as kimono designs since olden times. They are often depicted with flowing water on summer kimono and are especially valuable as motifs for expressing the water's edge. They are also often shown with yatsuhashi, bridges that run in a zigzag course. Iris root has a pleasant fragrance and in the Heian era was used by noble families as gifts or to decorate roofs. The flower offers protection from evil spirits.

Matsu (pine) is one of the Shou Chiku Bai (Three Friends of Winter), which comprises matsu, také (bamboo) and ume (plum blossom) and is traditionally used as a ranking system in Japan. Matsu is considered of the first rank, také of the second and ume of the third. Since ancient times, these three plants have been symbols of longevity, friendship, strength and integrity. Over time they have become common subjects in Chinese and Japanese painting, calligraphy and textiles, becoming an expression of celebration and joy. Matsu symbolizes longevity, steadfastness and wisdom and is profoundly associated with winter and the New Year. Sometimes it's also represented by the pine bark diamond pattern.

Kawa (river or winding stream) represents continuity and the future.

Amime is a pattern made of the intersection of curved lines, resembling a fishermans’ stitch. Because of its simple beauty, it came to fashion in Edo period, often dyed on ceramics and hand towels. The pattern that combined it with octopus, prawn and fish, likening the amime pattern to a real fishing net, was born after Edo period, and fishermans and people of fish market loved it as symbol of a very successful fishing. It was also used as a family crest of military commanders as the net fishing represents their wish for defeating enemies.

Komon means "fine pattern" and is also a name for patterns made up of tiny details, appearing like a solid color from afar like this one. Edo komon is said to be originated from fine patterns put on the warriors formal dress called kamishimo in the Edo period .The fine patterns were first used in kamishimo in the Muromachi period and were widely used and developed as patterns during 1624-1644 in the Edo period. It is called komon gata or kamishimo komon and each feudal lord monopolized his own pattern denoting his feudal government. In the middle of the Edo period, however, the patterns were loved and widely used by common people and became finer and more diverse.

 

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