Komorebi #36

€185,00
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Golden hitoe bachi eri kimono of the komon type. The pattern in this kimono has three layers: a subtle, textured one, with small little flowery details; a second layer, with dyed yama and matsu motifs; and a third one, hand painted in gold on top of the mountains and the pines.

 

FIT

Dress Length: 150 cm | 59"

Sleeve Length: 33 cm | 13"

Shoulder to Shoulder: 65 cm | 25.6"

 

MATERIAL

Handmande in Japan

Exterior 100% silk

 

HISTORY

A kimono without liner is called hitoe, which means "single cloth". It is exclusively worn from June to September, the Summer season in Japan. In bachi eri, the collar is folded and sewn down to the body, extending naturally towards the erisaki (the bottom of the collar). It is called bachi eri because its shape is like bachi, the stick used to play the samisen (a three-stringed traditional Japanese musical instrument derived from the Chinese instrument sanxian).

Komon is an informal kimono whose pattern repeats throughout the piece and often incorporates vertical stripes. Originally used as casual clothing, it is nowadays very rare since, with the westernization of clothing in Japan and the disuse of kimonos as a day-to-day wear, tailors have virtually ceased to produce it.

Cha of chairo means Japanese green tea, and brownish colors were generated by decocted green tea. It became fashionable and various chairo colors were produced in Edo era.

Yama (mountains) symbolizes sacred places between heaven and earth. Birds flying over mountains signify overcoming life’s challenges.

Matsu (pine) is one of the Shou Chiku Bai (Three Friends of Winter), which comprises matsu, také (bamboo) and ume (plum blossom) and is traditionally used as a ranking system in Japan. Matsu is considered of the first rank, také of the second and ume of the third. Since ancient times, these three plants have been symbols of longevity, friendship, strength and integrity. Over time they have become common subjects in Chinese and Japanese painting, calligraphy and textiles, becoming an expression of celebration and joy. Matsu symbolizes longevity, steadfastness and wisdom and is profoundly associated with winter and the New Year. Sometimes it's also represented by the pine bark diamond pattern.

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