Komorebi #15

€220,00

Burgundy awase hiro eri kimono of the iro tomesode type with karakusa texture and a chukage yama sakura mon. Because it has one crest, it is of the hitotsu mon type. The fabric is habutae, a smooth, glossy silk cloth with a fine weave.

 

FIT

Dress Length: 153 cm | 60.2"

Sleeve Length: 34 cm | 13.4"

Shoulder to Shoulder: 67 cm | 26.4"

 

MATERIAL

Handmande in Japan

Exterior 100% synthetic silk

Lining 100% taffeta

 

HISTORY

Awase is a lined kimono, exclusively worn between October and May (from Autumn to Spring in Japan). In hiro eri, the collar is wide and its inside is not sewn to the body. When put on, the lapel can be folded in two to feature the widht desired and fall naturally toward the erisaki (the bottom of the collar). It is used in many women’s kimonos.

In Japanese culture, iromuji has both formal and informal use and is therefore considered the basic kimono, often being the first kimono worn by the Japanese in adulthood. It is a plain color piece that can take on any color except black and can have texture but never pattern. With mon (crests), it becomes more formal and converts into iro tomesode.

Mon means crest. The term kamon refers to a crest used in Japan to indicate one's origins, that is, one's family lineage, blood line, ancestry and status. It is said that there are more than 20,000 distinct individual Kamon in Japan. Garments with mon are divided into three types: itsutsu mon (five crests), mitsu mon (three crests) and hitotsu mon (one crest). If it has just one mon, it will be at the center back; if it has three mon, they will be at the center back and on the back of the sleeves; and if it has five mon, there will be one on the front and back of each sleeve and one at the center back.

Karakusa (arabesque) is an ornamental pattern consisting of interwined flowing lines inspired by stalks and tendrils and by the links between the leaves and vines of plants. Originated in the western Asia region, it spread throughout the world. A grape and arabesque motif can often be seen in the art of Persia during the Sassanid dynasty (300-700 CE). In China, the pattern appeared in the Han Dynasty (206 BCE-220CE), but its use for adorning clothing became widespread only with the arrival of buddhism in China after the third century. Karakusa became a central motif for clothing decoration during the Tang Dynasty (618-907 CE). The pattern is thought to have entered Japan in the fifth century via the Silk Road from China. Combined with botanical motifs such as hollyhocks, chrysanthemums and peonies, there is no limit to the number of karakusa patterns taht can be created. It is a symbol for eternity and sometimes a symbol for a family's legacy, like a family tree in the Western culture.

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