Komorebi #130

€180,00

Coral and green hitoe bachi eri kimono of the komon type with silver thread details along a botan pattern. It has been adapted to midi coat.

 

FIT 

Dress Length: 123 cm | 48.4"

Sleeve Length: 32 cm | 12.6"

Shoulder to Shoulder: 59 cm | 23.2"

 

MATERIAL 

Handmande in Japan

100% cotton

 

HISTORY 

A kimono without liner is called hitoe, which means "single cloth". It is exclusively worn from June to September, the Summer season in Japan. In bachi eri, the collar is folded and sewn down to the body, extending naturally towards the erisaki (the bottom of the collar). It is called bachi eri because its shape is like bachi, the stick used to play the samisen (a three-stringed traditional Japanese musical instrument derived from the Chinese instrument sanxian).

Komon is an informal kimono whose pattern repeats throughout the piece and often incorporates vertical stripes. Originally used as casual clothing, it is nowadays very rare since, with the westernization of clothing in Japan and the disuse of kimonos as a day-to-day wear, tailors have virtually ceased to produce it.

Hanakotoba is the Japanese form of the language of flowers. The Japanese have a long tradition of associating meanings to flowers, and they have influenced numerous aspects of their culture from kimono to war. Flowers such as the sakura (cherry blossom) and kiku (chrysanthemum) are national symbols of Japan. Such flowers have the power to invoke powerful emotions and they are engaged in the people's thinking. Beyond these national symbols, others have more subtle meanings. In Japan, they are a traditional gift for both men and women, and are often used to convey what can't be spoken. Even nowadays, flower meanings make occasional appearances in modern popular culture such as manga and anime.

Botan (peony), which blooms in late Spring, has been justly called the "king of flowers". It is believed to have been firs introduced to Japan from China during the Nara period (710-94). Later, in the Heian period (794-1185), it was cultivated at temples throughout the country, grown at first for its medicinal properties and later for its beauty. In the late Muromachi period (1334-1537), the peony started making an appearance in paintings and sculpture. But it was not until the Edo period (1615-1868) that peonies became all the rage and numerous ornamental varieties were grown. This period also saw the cultivation of a winter blooming variety whose roots and blossoms are protected under canopies of straw. Love of the peonies continues to endure and it has remained a favorite kimono motif up to this day, symbolizing wealth, nobility and ageless beauty.

Most of the greenish colors were generated by vegetation and their names derived from vegetation and birds.

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