Komorebi #106

€165,00

Blue and white awase hiro eri haori jacket. It has a geometric hishi pattern with botan, kiku, seigaiha and kanoko shibori details inside the diamonds.

 

FIT 

Dress Length: 62 cm | 24.4"

Sleeve Length: 32 cm | 12.6"

Shoulder to Shoulder: 59 cm | 23.2"

 

MATERIAL

Exterior 100% cotton

Lining 100% synthetic silk

 

HISTORY

October and May (from Autumn to Spring in Japan). In hiro eri, the collar is wide and its inside is not sewn to the body. When put on, the lapel can be folded in two to feature the widht desired and fall naturally toward the erisaki (the bottom of the collar). It is used in many women’s kimonos.

Haori is a kimono jacket, quite long, with the deep kimono sleeves, traditionally worn over the kimono. A haori is not worn with an obi or any sash around it. It can be closed edge to edge with a himo, which is a pair of front ties that are fastened to the inner edge. Men's haori are usually plain on the outside, either with or without mon, but often have very decorative linings hidden inside.

Hishi is a geometric pattern based on rhombus. It is believed that this shape was created spontaneously in prehistoric Japan, and several variations were developed in the Heian era as a pattern for Japanese textiles. There are many variations, however the most interesting are yotsuwaribishi or waribishi (quartered diamond), the pattern with flowers instead of diamond shapes, called hanabishi mon'you, very common between Heian and Kamakura Period; and saiwaibishi, the combination of geometrical and floral pattern.

Hanakotoba is the Japanese form of the language of flowers. The Japanese have a long tradition of associating meanings to flowers, and they have influenced numerous aspects of their culture from kimono to war. Flowers such as the sakura (cherry blossom) and kiku (chrysanthemum) are national symbols of Japan. Such flowers have the power to invoke powerful emotions and they are engaged in the people's thinking. Beyond these national symbols, others have more subtle meanings. In Japan, they are a traditional gift for both men and women, and are often used to convey what can't be spoken. Even nowadays, flower meanings make occasional appearances in modern popular culture such as manga and anime.

Botan (peony), which blooms in late Spring, has been justly called the "king of flowers". It is believed to have been firs introduced to Japan from China during the Nara period (710-94). Later, in the Heian period (794-1185), it was cultivated at temples throughout the country, grown at first for its medicinal properties and later for its beauty. In the late Muromachi period (1334-1537), the peony started making an appearance in paintings and sculpture. But it was not until the Edo period (1615-1868) that peonies became all the rage and numerous ornamental varieties were grown. This period also saw the cultivation of a winter blooming variety whose roots and blossoms are protected under canopies of straw. Love of the peonies continues to endure and it has remained a favorite kimono motif up to this day, symbolizing wealth, nobility and ageless beauty.

Kiku (chrysanthemum) represents longevity and rejuvenation. When first introduced in Japan during the Nara Period (ad 710–784), the Japanese royal family was fascinated with the flower. Eventually, during the passing of the years, the chrysanthemum became the imperial family emblem. Even now, it is used as the imperial symbol of Japan and figures on the Japanese passport. No plant is used in such a multitude of patterns as the chrysanthemum. Patterns showing this flower are called kikukamon; designs depicting chrysanthemum attached to stems are known as oriedakiku and flowers standing upright are called tatekikumon. A design in which chrysanthemums are rendered along with flowing water is called kikusui; teamed with a fence, the design is called kikumagaki. There is also much variation in terms of the flowers themselves, from the type whose petals are long and dishevelled, known as rangiku, to the round, extremely abstract kind which appear in works by the artist Kourin Ogata and are called kouringiku. The leaves of the chrysanthemums are on ovoid shape with jagged edges and appear in patterns in the form of rippled lines. The Chrysanthemum Festival, or Choyo or Kikuno-Sekku, is celebrated on the ninth month in the lunar calendar. It is an old Chinese custom that made its way to Japan and was adopted mainly at court. On that day, activities included drinking saké with chrysanthemum petals floating in it and wearing cotton that has been placed on top of the flowers overnight to soak up their dew. Drinking chrysanthemum saké was believed to ward off malevolence and ensure a long life.

Wave patterns are common in Japan because the country is surrounded by sea and has a large number or rivers. Summer kimonos feature all kinds of wave designs, ranging from layered concentric circles creating arches in a blue ocean, to waves boldly cresting or gently rippling. Favored for their vigor, waves are also often incorporated as motifs in family crests (kamon). There are also many patterns in which waves are combined with plovers, rabbits, swallows and other creatures. Seigaiha means "blue ocean waves." This pattern has been used in Egypt, Persia and around the world. In Japan, it is said that the name comes from seigaiha, the title of an ancient Japanese court dance. In ancient times, it was used for auspicious events. It is considered a symbol of peace, good luck and good fortune.

Shibori is a Japanese dyeing technique that typically involves folding, twisting or bunching cloth and binding it, then dyeing it in paint. Whatever is used to bind the fabric will resist the dye, resulting in areas of the cloth that take the distinctive dye in patterns created by the resistance, and other areas of the cloth that remain white. Kumo shibori produces a spider web effect. Arashi shibori produces a storm effect. Kanoko shibori produces a pattern resembling the spots on a fawn bounded in squares.

 

 

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